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Dermatopathology

The Dermatopathology Division of the Department of Pathology at North Shore-LIJ Health System provides a full range of diagnostic services in the interpretation of skin specimens. We are committed to providing outstanding patient care, educating future medical professionals and engaging in clinical and translational research.

Dermatopathology is a subspecialty of pathology dealing with the diagnosis and evaluation of biopsy specimens obtained from the skin, nails and mucous membranes. Dermatopathologists work closely with dermatologists and other physicians who deal with the skin in the diagnosis and treatment of a wide variety of human diseases.
 

Experience

Our Dermatopathology Laboratory produces high quality hematoxylin and eosin stained slides from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded skin specimens (the typical process and stain used in most skin biopsies). In addition, our laboratory provides a variety of special histochemical stains, immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence, which allow dermatopathologists to arrive at a specific and accurate diagnosis in unusual or difficult cases.
 

Expertise

Dr. Shang Chen is board certified in anatomic pathology as well as dermatopathology and specializes in the histopathologic interpretation of biopsy specimens of skin. Special areas of interest include melanocytic nevi, melanoma, infectious diseases and inflammatory dermatoses.
 

Timely Results

Our dermatopathologists diagnose most specimens within 48 hours. Reports are sent by courier, mail, fax or electronic submission as requested. All melanomas, unexpected high grade malignancies and serious inflammatory or infectious diseases are first reported by telephone. Our dermatopathologists are available to speak directly with referring physicians.

We strive to provide specific and accurate diagnosis in each and every case and convey it in a clear, concise report.
 

Tests

Full dermatopathology service includes special stains, immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence.

 

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