FAQ's

What are some of the things that can increase my risk for ovarian cancer?

How do I know if my bleeding is not normal?

What is an endometrial biopsy?

What is colposcopy?

What can I do to prevent or fight cervical cancer?

Where can I get more information about my cancer?

 

Q. What are some of the things that can increase my risk for ovarian cancer?

 

A. Having had breast cancer, or having a family history of ovarian, breast, or colorectal cancer are some of the things that can increase your risk for ovarian cancer.

 

Q. How do I know if my bleeding is not normal?

 

A. In general, any bleeding after menopause is not normal and should be discussed with your doctor. Also, before menopause, bleeding that is not regular for you, or that has a different frequency or amount than your normal cycle should be discussed. This means very heavy bleeding, bleeding that lasts longer than normal for you, bleeding that happens more than every three weeks, and bleeding after sex or between periods. It is important to tell your doctor about any abnormal bleeding.

 

Q. What is an endometrial biopsy?

 

A. An endometrial biopsy is when the gynecologist, using a thin tube, takes a small amount of tissue from the lining of the uterus, and has the sample tested in a lab for abnormal cells.

 

Q. What is colposcopy?

  

A. Colposcopy is a test that lets the doctor look at your cervix and vagina through a magnifying scope.  This technique enables one to identify problems that cannot be seen with the naked eye.


Q. What can I do to prevent or fight cervical cancer? 

 

A. One of the best ways to fight or prevent cervical cancer is to have regular Pap tests and gynecologic exams. In addition, not smoking is another way to help fight cancer.


Q. Where can I get information about my cancer?

 

A.     National Cancer Institute (NCI)  and  Society of Gynecologic Oncologists

top