Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy

The Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy (LSG), also called gastric sleeve or vertical gastric sleeve, restricts the amount of food and calories that can be eaten by removing 80% to 90% of the stomach. However, it does not bypass the small intestine. The surgeon creates a small sleeve-shaped stomach that is about the size of a banana. With the gastric sleeve procedure, the stomach is less likely to expand over time than with other bariatric surgeries. It drastically reduces the volume of food tolerated while preserving the stomach’s functions. Individuals who undergo this procedure will eventually be able to eat about one to two cups of food per meal, three times a day. They’ll feel satisfied and full while losing an average of 45% to 55% of excess body weight in the first year.

Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery

Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass is a combination procedure that uses both restrictive (limiting the size of the stomach) and malabsorptive (limiting the amount of calories and nutrients absorbed) elements. If the Roux-en-Y gastric bypass procedure is done laparoscopically, five small holes are created in the abdomen that allow the surgeon to pass a light, camera and surgical instruments into the abdomen. The abdomen is inflated with carbon dioxide to allow the surgeon a better view. Then the surgeon uses surgical instruments about the width of a pencil to bypass a portion of the stomach and leaves a small pouch to hold about 1⁄4 cup of solid food or about 2 ounces of fluid. A connection is then made directly into the small intestine where digestion begins. After a Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass surgery, patients can expect a two- to-four-day hospital stay and a three-to-four-week recovery period at home.

Lap Band Surgery

Lap Band Surgery is minimally invasive, providing the advantages of reduced pain, less time in the hospital and shorter recovery period. There is no cutting or stapling of the stomach or bypassing the intestines during the procedure. If for any reason the lap band needs to be removed, the stomach generally returns to its original form. The lap band is a silicone elastomer ring that is placed laparoscopically around the upper part of the stomach. The ring is filled with saline on the inner surface. The lap band is connected to an access port that is placed beneath the skin during surgery. The surgeon is able to adjust the lap band by adding or subtracting saline inside the inner balloon via the access port. This ability to adjust the lap band helps drive the rate of weight loss. If weight loss is inadequate as a result of a loose lap band, the surgeon will add more saline to reduce the size of the opening and further restrict the amount of food that can move through it. If the band it too tight, the surgeon will loosen the band by removing some saline, thus reducing the amount of restriction. After lap band surgery, you will need a new nutrition plan. Discuss this with your surgeon and a dietitian. It is very important to follow the eating and drinking instructions starting right after the operation to allow for complete healing.

Open Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery

Open Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass is a combination procedure that uses both restrictive (limiting the size of the stomach) and malabsorptive (limiting the amount of calories and nutrients absorbed) elements. Open Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery requires the construction of a small pouch that holds about 1/4 cup of solid food, or about 2 ounces of beverage or other fluid. The small pouch is constructed with four rows of staples. A connection is then made directly into the small intestine where digestion begins. This surgery is done through an abdominal incision between your navel and rib cage. The surgeon will perform the surgery through this incision and close the incision with internal stitches. Staples will be used on the outside of the incision and will be removed about one week later at the time of your first post-operative visit.

Single-incision laparoscopic surgery

Single-Incision Laparoscopic Surgery (SILS) is a minimally invasive laparoscopic surgery procedure that can be used for adjustable gastric banding. In contrast to the five to six small incisions that are commonly made in adjustable gastric banding surgery, laparoscopic surgery allows for a single, small incision. This can result in decreased scarring and faster healing. However, Single-Incision Laparoscopic Surgery is not suitable for every patient. Excess weight, severe adhesions, significant infection or scar tissue from prior surgeries play a role in the decision to either prohibit patients from undergoing the procedure or require a secondary, small puncture or incision if they go through with the surgery.

StomaphyX procedure

If you have regained weight lost after a gastric bypass, you may be a candidate for the StomaphyX procedure. Specifically designed for this situation, the StomaphyX procedure is a new, safe way to reduce the stomach through an endoscopic procedure without an incision. It can restore the restriction created during the original gastric bypass surgery. Although most gastric bypass patients lose a significant amount of weight following surgery and keep it off, some slight weight gain after about two years often does occur. However, when the stomach pouch and stomach outlet stretch too much, poor portion control may result and lead to weight gain. Determining whether you qualify for the StomaphyX procedure involves a complete physical exam, including an endoscopy and nutritional counseling.

ROSE procedure

If you have regained weight lost after a gastric bypass, you may be a candidate for the ROSE procedure. Specifically designed for this situation, the ROSE procedure gastric bypass is a new, safe way to reduce the stomach through an endoscopic procedure without an incision. It can restore the restriction created during the original gastric bypass surgery. Although most gastric bypass patients lose a significant amount of weight following surgery and keep it off, some slight weight gain after about two years often does occur. However, when the stomach pouch and stomach outlet stretch too much, poor portion control may result and lead to weight gain. Determining whether you qualify for the ROSE procedure involves a complete physical exam, including an endoscopy and nutritional counseling.